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in an effort to provide distraction...

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...from the election--and, let's face it, whether you are pro-Obama or pro-McCain, today is probably nerve-wracking for you--I thought I'd provide an excerpt from Pulp Heroes:

Detective Nobody. Detective Nobody was created by Robert Kraft (Atalanta, Frank Carter, Gentleman of the Air, Count Leo V. Hagen, Loke Klingsor, Mister Nobody (I), Richard) and appeared in Detektiv Nobody's Erlebnisse und Reiseabenteuer #1-12 (1904-1906). Detective Nobody is a Costumed Avenger. The domino-masked "Detective Nobody" is a reporter who travels around the world, from St. Petersburg to Monte Carlo to the South Seas, on behalf of Worlds Magazine, fighting the Yellow Peril Baron Nogi and his Yellow Dragon organization. In this Nobody is assisted by a brave crew of friends, including the daring Captain Flederwisch, who pilots Nobody’s yacht, and Keigo, a Japanese man Nobody saved from the gallows. The Yellow Dragon has agents everywhere, including Missisippi river pirates, a group with a subterranean headquarters underneath the Pyramids, and various Femmes Fatale, one a Mexican sadist and one Nobody’s blonde former lover. Some of Nobody’s stories verge on the fantastic, as in the story in which he discovers a hollow mountain inhabited by prehistoric flora and fauna. Some of Detektiv Nobody’s story titles were "The Rejuvenation Treatment," "Of the Cossacks," "Princess Turandot," and "In Noah's Ark."

Detective No. 55. Detective No. 55 was created by Wang Yuanlong (Black Cat, Silver Pistol Thief) and appeared in the film 55 Hao Zhentan (1929). Detective No. 55 is a Chinese police detective active in contemporary Shanghai.

Detective’s Wife. The Detective’s Wife was created by Zhang Huimin (Bai Suying) and appeared in the film Zhentan Zhiqi (1928). The Detective’s Wife is the wife of a Chinese policeman. Unfortunately, the policeman gets himself into a case which is beyond his capabilities to successfully solve. Fortunately, the policeman’s wife is a skilled martial artist, and when she puts on male clothing and begins kicking criminals in the head, the policeman is saved. Of course, the disguised Detective’s Wife is the object of another woman’s crush, but such things happen.

Devi. Devi appeared in a number of stories in Wizard from 1934 to 1936. Devi is a sinister Tibetan Yellow Peril who begins a war on the West by unleashing the "Worms of Doom" on Britain. The Worms can eat through steel and begin by destroying the Forth Bridge in Scotland. Chaos ensues.

Devi, Savita. Savita Devi was created by J.B.H. Wadia (Hansa, Hind Kesari, Lion Man (II), Thunderbolt (II)) and appeared in the film Miss Frontier Mail (1936). Savita Devi is an Indian big game hunter. In Lalwadi, on the western coast of India, the wicked masked criminal Signal X and his gang are robbing trains, committing murders, and even blowing up trains. Signal X is actually Savita’s uncle Shyamlal, who is being paid by an airplane company to wreck railway travel as a way to promote the company. When Savita discovers what her uncle is doing, she uses her guns and her athletic skills to put an end to his crimes.

Devil Bear. Devil Bear was created by Sargeson V. Halstead and appeared in the film The Devil Bear (1929). Captain Epsom is the captain on a ship off the western coast of Canada. Epsom is attacked during a mutiny and struck on the head, causing him to lose his memory. Fortunately for Epsom, he owns a pet gorilla, who rescues Epsom from the mutineers and hides him in a cave on the coast. The gorilla drives off the local, hostile natives, who dub him "Devil Bear." Devil Bear goes on to foil the evil schemes of a group of men who are trying to swindle Jack Crawford, an engineer, out of the ownership of a rich mine. The Devil Bear rescues Grace Wilmot, the daughter of a missionary, who falls in love with Crawford, and then strikes Epsom on the head. Epsom recovers his memory, and Wilmot and Crawford marry.
Current Mood:
nervous nervous
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On November 4th, 2008 06:37 pm (UTC), dvandom commented:
I still think your nervous ferret mood icon looks like a Pez dispenser....
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On November 4th, 2008 06:42 pm (UTC), ratmmjess replied:
Heh. Yeah, it does. But it about expresses my mood. (i.e., someone's about to pop my head open and remove the candy).
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On November 4th, 2008 07:29 pm (UTC), billfl commented:
Y'know, if someone in Hollywood was smart (I know, there's the problem right there), they'd dust some of these concepts off and make a bajillion bucks off the ensuing movie(s).
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On November 4th, 2008 11:30 pm (UTC), full_metal_ox replied:
*If* someone in Hollywood was smart enough.

Barry Hughart, author of the Master Li and Number Ten Ox series, describes the reason an executive at Paramount had for rejecting a proposed film treatment of "Bridge of Birds": "Who wants to watch a movie about ancient Chinks?"

(I devoutly hope that the party responsible turned down distribution rights to "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" in similar terms, and that this became known to the stockholders.)
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On November 4th, 2008 08:39 pm (UTC), (Anonymous) commented:
I think I'm going to put Devil Bear into a fanfic.

MM
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On November 4th, 2008 09:45 pm (UTC), joeymichaels commented:
Ah, thank you. Sweet, sweet reference entries about cool things.

My favorite Marvel publication was always their Superhero index.
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On November 4th, 2008 09:48 pm (UTC), ratmmjess replied:
Huh. I hadn't thought about it, but I guess my pulp book is simply one vast Hero index.

Cool!
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On November 4th, 2008 10:41 pm (UTC), joeymichaels replied:
Its even more awesome because its stuff I never heard of before. That is part of what I loved about 'Victoriana.' It got me interested in a bunch of characters I didn't even know existed. If I had the time, I would so totally be seeking out the books those characters are from. :D
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On November 4th, 2008 10:48 pm (UTC), jonlaw commented:
Very cool and intriguing entries. They do make me want the book. I have to make sure I don't "blink" (okay it was like two years of distraction) and miss it like Victoriana.

Thanks for a break from election madness and sending my mind down some other paths. I am still blown away by the wackiness of "Devil Bear."
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On November 4th, 2008 11:55 pm (UTC), ratmmjess replied:
A minuscule fraction is available online--very, very little.

As for the foreign language material--essentially none of it is available in English. I've done a huge amount of translating.
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On November 5th, 2008 02:25 am (UTC), richardthinks commented:
you have a thing for gorillas, no?
I know this is irritating and petty but I can't help myself: shouldn't it be femmes fatales?
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On November 5th, 2008 02:29 am (UTC), ratmmjess replied:
I do have a thing for gorillas, yeah--everything's better with primates.

And, strictly speaking, because it is the femme that is plural, not the fatale, it's femmes fatale.
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On November 5th, 2008 03:04 am (UTC), richardthinks replied:
really? Doesn't the adjective agree with the gender and number of the noun?
http://www.languageguide.org/francais/grammar/adjectives/index.html

It's a while since I looked at any French, I may well be wrong.
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On November 5th, 2008 03:23 am (UTC), ratmmjess replied:
Huh. I looked this up in some usage manuals a few years back, and "femmes fatale" is the answer I got, but online it says "femmes fatales." I'll have to doublecheck this in Garner.
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On January 23rd, 2009 04:50 pm (UTC), panmodal commented:
The Devil Bear
Is this film extant? It sounds like a must-see, if it still exists.
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On January 27th, 2009 10:27 pm (UTC), ratmmjess replied:
Re: The Devil Bear
I believe it is a lost film, unfortunately.
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On January 28th, 2009 01:51 am (UTC), panmodal replied:
Re: The Devil Bear
Well damn.
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